As food supplies decline, chimps in the Budongo Forest are raiding farmers’ crops. What is causing the decline in food? How can the area support both farmers and primate foragers?

In the Budongo Forest Reserve in Uganda, fruit production by forest trees is mysteriously declining. As a result, chimps and other primates are raiding local subsistence farms. Dr. Fred Babweteera of the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland, along with graduate students from Makerere University, Kampala, is studying the foraging habits of primates and the pollination and fruiting cycles of fruit trees with the goal of developing new approaches to sharing resources between people and primates—and they need your help.

On this expedition you’ll have a unique opportunity to meet our closest relatives in their natural habitat. About 700 chimpanzees live in the Budongo Forest Reserve, the largest remaining tropical rainforest in East Africa. In addition, there are four other major primate species in the Budongo Forest. You’ll team up with field assistants at the Budongo Conservation Field Station to observe chimps and other primates as they forage for food in the morning and late afternoon. You’ll learn to identify local trees and work alongside researchers to monitor trees, set and empty insect traps, and label and preserve the collected insects for later identification. You’ll help write up the data and relax at the research camp, enjoy sports with members of the Reserve staff, or walk the “Royal Mile” to take in the natural beauty of the rainforest.

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Location

Budongo Forest Reserve, Uganda

Cost

$4195

Includes all accommodation, meals, transfers, insurance and research activities

Duration

12 days

Dates

TBA

Activity Level

Strenuous

Lead Scientist

Fred Babweteera